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Food is important to me - and to the Japanese people.

I wonder if everybody in Japan can make food?

 

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FINALLY, I am in Japan!

I'm thrilled with what I see!

So many impressions!
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I have never seen so many different signs.

   
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wikipedia: Hanami  (flower viewing) is the Japanese traditional custom of enjoying the transient beauty of flowers; flowers (hana) are in this case almost always referring to those of the cherry (sakura).

It is a beautiful tradition, almost too beautiful.

I learn that trees are sacred in Japan, it has to do with the shinto beliefs and shrines and that there are gods in everything, not only living creatures but also surrounding all things. When googling on sacred trees in Japan, I found this interesting article by Hiroshi Omura, he concludes with:

In Japan more than 15 tree species are related to the Shinto and Buddhist religions. Some large old trees in which gods are said to exist are located in shrines or temples. These religious uses of special trees, to summon the gods and identify sacred areas, are also found in other countries. It is important to understand that these uses are common rather than distinct to Japan. Shinto shrines have managed their sacred forests for many centuries. Because such forests and large trees have preserved a solemn atmosphere and also conserved parts of the natural environment, they should continue to be protected and conserved as natural monuments.

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japan New vs. Old.

wikipedia: Shinto or kami-no-michi (among other names) is the traditional religion of Japan that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day Japan and its ancient past.
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    japan Lost in translation. japan japan   japan    
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To think that I am not going
To think of you any more
Is still thinking of you.
Let me then try not to think
That I am not going to think of you. *


* To think is omou in Japanese. Omou means not only to think, but to recollect, to long for, to love, etc. It has an affective as well as intellectual value. The word is almost a general term for anything that goes on in ones' mind. Therefore, not to think (omowanu) is to keep the mind utterly empty of all contents - a blank state of emptiness which is mushin or munen.

-from Zen and Japanese culture, Daisetz T. Suzuki

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